Tag: Transesophageal Echo in Houston

Transesophageal ECHO in Houston

Transesophageal ECHO -This is an alternative way to perform an echocardiogram. A specialized probe containing an ultrasound transducer at its tip is passed into the patient’s esophagus This allows image and Doppler evaluation which can be recorded. This is known as a transesophageal echocardiogram, or TOE (TEE in the United States). Transesophageal echocardiograms are most often utilized when transthoracic images are suboptimal and when a more clear and precise image is needed for assessment. This test is performed in the presence of a cardiologist, registered nurse, and ultrasound technician.

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Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease in which the heart muscle (myocardium) becomes abnormally thick (hypertrophied). The thickened heart muscle can make it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect people of any age. About one out of every 500 people has HCM. It affects men and women equally.

Other Names for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

  • Asymmetric Septal Hypertrophy
  • Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Non-obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Idiopathic Hypertrophic Sub-aortic Stenosis (IHSS)

Causes of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

HCM is a genetic condition caused by a change or mutation in one or more genes and is passed on through families. Each child of someone with HCM has a 50 per cent chance of inheriting the condition. HCM is a common cause of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in young people, including young athletes.

HCM also can affect the heart’s mitral valve, causing blood to leak backward through the valve. Sometimes, the thickened heart muscle doesn’t block blood flow out of the left ventricle. This is called non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The entire ventricle may thicken, or the thickening may happen only at the bottom of the heart. The right ventricle also may be affected.

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Symptoms of HCM:

Many people with HCM don’t experience any symptoms. However, the following symptoms may occur during physical activity:

You may find that you never have any serious problems related to your condition, and with treatment, your symptoms should be controlled. However some people may find that their symptoms worsen or become harder to control in later life.

The area of heart muscle that is affected by HCM and the amount of stiffening that occurs will determine how the symptoms affect you.

For some people, a number of other conditions can develop as a result of having HCM. These may include abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias, including heart block and endocarditis.

Other symptoms that might occur, at any time, include:

  • Chest pain
  • Palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • High blood pressure
  • Light headedness and fainting

 

Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

The health care provider will perform a physical exam and listen to the heart and lungs with a stethoscope. Signs may include abnormal heart sounds or a heart murmur. These sounds may change with different body positions, High blood pressure, the pulse in your arms and neck will also be checked. The doctor may feel an abnormal heartbeat in the chest.

Close family members of people who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be screened for the condition. Tests used to diagnose heart muscle thickness, problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves (mitral valve regurgitation) may include:

  • Echocardiography, ECG
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • MRI of the heart, Chest X-ray
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)
  • 24-hour Holter monitor (heart rhythm monitor)

Risk Factors include:

Any strenuous exercise that increases after load (i.e., heavy weight lifting/training) can theoretically increase the magnitude of LV hypertrophy over time and thus worsen obstruction in subjects with pre-existing HCM. Risk factors for the development of end-stage HCM (manifesting as LV systolic dysfunction and LV dilation) include younger age of onset/presentation of HCM, a family history of HCM, increased ventricular wall thickness, along with the presence of certain genetic mutations in certain individuals.

Treatment of HCM:

At present there is no cure for HCM, but treatments are available to help control your symptoms and prevent complications. Your treatment will depend on how your heart is affected and what symptoms you have. You may need:

  • A Pacemaker – to control your heart rate
  • Medicines – to help control your blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms
  • An ICD – if you are at risk of having a life threatening abnormal heart rhythm

Seek counsel from our Houston Cardiologist if you suspect you are suffering from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) for the best treatment options for you.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com|Call: +1 281-866-7701.

Automatic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (AICD)

Automatic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (AICD) is a device that monitors a person’s heart rate. They are generally implanted into heart failure patients. AICD intended to convert life threatening rhythms of the heart which may cause sudden cardiac death also known as cardiac arrest, to a sinus (normal) rhythm. An abnormal heart beats are referred to as arrhythmias either one that beats too fast (Tachycardia), too slow (Brachycardia) or irregularly referred as Atrial Fibrillation.

Defibrillators treat arrhythmias in two ways: in the first instance the device tries to stop the abnormal rhythm with a burst of high speed pacing. If that fails, the device will deliver an electrical shock to the heart to reset its rhythm. Patients are usually not aware of cardioversion and nearly always aware of defibrillation. It is also capable of collecting and storing information about your heart’s electrical activity for your cardiologist to check. Cardiologist will program the defibrillator to deliver the best therapy for you.

The AICD gives your heart a shock if you suspect life threatening arrhythmias or an abnormally high heart rate. Some arrhythmias can cause the heart to completely stop beating. The shock given by the AICD can make the heart start beating normally again. An AICD can also make your heart beat faster if your heart is not beating fast enough.

The AICD System Consists of:

A small computer chip that tells the AICD when to deliver a shock

Batteries designed to last 4 to 5 years and deliver about 100 shocks

A pulse generator that can send an electrical impulse or shock to the heart

Electrodes that sense the rhythm of the heart and deliver a shock to the heart muscle

Doctor can also program the AICD to deliver a variety of sophisticated electrical therapies depending on the type of abnormal rhythm problem being treated.

Procedure:

An intravenous (IV) line will be started in your arm. Your doctor will inject a local anesthetic to numb the site where the device will be placed. Typically AICDs are implanted just under the collarbone, usually on the left side. Your doctor will make a small incision in the skin. From there, lead wires are passed through a vein to your heart and then tested to check their position in your heart. A little pocket is made under the skin for the pulse generator. It is about the size of a book of matches. The leads are connected to the pulse generator, and tested. Then your doctor will close the incision and program the device.

Potential Risks or Complications Associated with the Implantation:

The procedure is extremely safe, with a low risk of complication. Most complications are minor and easily treated, such as pain, bleeding and bruising at the implant site.

An infrequent complication is pneumothorax, a condition when the lung is accidentally punctured during the insertion of the lead. Air then leaks into the chest cavity, causing the lung to collapse. This condition can be treated with insertion of a chest tube to allow the air to escape and the lung to re-expand.

A rare but serious complication is infection of the implant site or the pulse generator/lead, requiring antibiotic therapy and even surgical removal of the entire AICD system if severe.

Factors that may Increase the Risk of Complications Include:

Obesity

History of smoking

Use of certain medications

Chronic diseases such as diabetes

Bleeding or blood-clotting problems

History of excess alcohol consumption

Symptoms:

Have chest pain or shortness of breath

Feel lightheaded and do not feel a shock

Call for medical help right away if you experience above life threatening symptoms. Seek counsel from our Heart Doctors in Houston for the best treatment options for you.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com|Call: +1 281-866-7701

 

Diagnostic Tests

In order to properly diagnosis an illness, an individual must undergo a series of tests. Some medical tests are simply a physical examination. Other tests require elaborate equipment used by medical technologists or the use of a sterile operating environment.
Specifically, a diagnostic test is a kind of medical test performed to aid in the diagnosis or detection of a disease.

For example, diagnostic tests can:

•    Diagnose diseases
•    measure the progress or recovery from disease
•    confirm that a person is free from disease

In the case of cardiologists, diagnostic tests are critical in detecting and monitoring illnesses of the heart and surrounding tissues.

For example, following are a few of the more common cardiology diagnostic tests:

•    Blood test
•    CAT Scans
•    Echocardiography
•    Electrocardiograms (EKG)
•    Exercise Stress Tests
•    MRIs
•    Cardiac catherization
•    Cardiac biopsy

Diagnostic tests are a safe way to look inside the heart and determine not only the ailment, but possibly the safest and most effective treatment option. Cardiologists rely on diagnostic testing to monitor a disease and watch its progression or improvement.

If preventative measures weren’t enough to keep you from falling victim to a heart or blood vessel disorder, in best case scenarios, diagnostic testing can quite possibly catch the ailment in an early stage where treatment is non-invasive and rapid.

If you fear you may suffer from a heart disorder, see your cardiologist immediately to gain an accurate diagnosis and an effective treatment plan.

logon to www.advancedcardiodr.com and know more about the dignostic tests provided by Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center.

Transesophageal Echo in Houston

Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE) is a way of performing an echocardiogram in which the echo transducer is placed in the esophagus or food pipe of the patient to get a much clearer image of the heart compared to the standard echo. Transesophageal Echo (TEE) gives clear images of the back structures of the heart, such as the left atrium, which may not be seen as well by a standard echo taken from the front of the heart.

Clearer images in the case of Transesophageal Echocardiography are possible because the heart rests directly upon the esophagus leaving only millimeters that the ultrasound beam has to travel. This reduces the attenuation of the ultrasound signal, generating a stronger return signal, ultimately enhancing image and Doppler quality. All these structures, along with the increased distance the beam must travel, weaken the ultrasound signal thus degrading the image and Doppler quality.

Test Procedure details of Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE):

Transesophageal Echo requires sedation to ease the discomfort and the throat is sprayed with an anesthetic to numb it. The ultrasound probe containing the echo transducer is then inserted into the patient’s mouth and the patient is asked to swallow. The tube goes down the esophagus the same way as swallowed food.

The transducer at the end of the tube is positioned in the esophagus, directly behind the heart. By rotating and moving the tip of the transducer, the physician can examine the heart from several different angles. The heart rate, blood pressure and breathing are monitored during the procedure. Oxygen is given as a preventive measure and suction is used, as needed.

Uses of Transesophageal Echocardiography:

  • Transesophageal Echo is used to evaluate and image the aorta, pulmonary artery, valves of the heart, both atria, atrial septum, left atrial appendage, and coronary arteries.
  • A Transesophageal Echo is extremely useful in detecting blood clots, masses and tumors that are located inside the heart.
  • Transesophageal Echo has a very high sensitivity for locating a blood clot inside the left atrium.
  • Transesophageal Echo is used to gauge the severity of certain valve problems and help detect infection of heart valves, certain congenital heart diseases and a tear of the aorta.
  • Transesophageal echocardiography is also beneficial where conditions such as closely positioned ribs, obesity and emphysema create technical difficulties in the use of Transesophageal Echo by limiting the transmission of the ultrasound beams to and from the heart.

An echocardiogram is a painless procedure that enables doctors to see how well the heart is functioning. The test utilizes sound waves to create moving images that are recorded and displayed on a system. Echocardiography enables physicians to see the size and shape of the heart. Echocardiography helps doctors to pinpoint heart muscles that aren’t working efficiently and detect blood clots or problems with major arteries.

Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center with a team of top cardiologists provides Transesophageal Echo Test Services in Houston at patient’s personal level.

Transesophageal Echo in Houston

A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is a diagnostic procedure that uses echocardiography to assess the heart’s function. During the procedure, a transducer sends out ultrasonic sound waves at a frequency too high to be heard. When the transducer is placed at certain locations and angles, the ultrasonic sound waves move through the skin and other body tissues to the heart tissues, where the waves bounce or “echo” off of the heart structures.

In transesophageal echocardiography, the ultrasound probe is passed down the throat and in to the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that goes from the throat to the stomach. The esophagus sits very close to the heart. This method allows for clearer images of the heart.

The transducer picks up the reflected waves and sends them to a computer. The computer displays the echoes as images of the heart walls and valves. Transesophageal echo test is performed in the presence of ultrasound technician, nurse and a cardiology doctor.

Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center with a team of board certified cardiologists provides Transesophageal Echo in Houston.

Transesophageal Echo in Houston

Transesophageal echo (TEE) uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to generate high-quality dynamic images of the heart and its blood vessels. Transesophageal echo (TEE) employs an ultrasound transducer to produce sound waves and is positioned on an endoscope that is guided down the throat into your esophagus.

As the esophagus lies immediately behind the heart, clear images of the heart and its valves can be obtained without the interference of the ribs or lungs. The ultrasound waves are reflected from the structures of the heart and picked up by the transducer; a computer attached to the echo machine converts them into images which are projected onto a monitor.

Transesophageal echo (TEE) is done in 2 methods.

Transesophageal echo can be divided into:

  • Two-dimensional (2D) Transesophageal echo: This is the standard commonly used test that generates 2D images of the heart and its related structures.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) Transesophageal echo: This type produces 3D images that provide additional details about the structure and function of the heart and its blood vessels. It assists in the diagnosis of heart problems such as congenital heart disease, heart valve disease, and also in heart surgery.

Our heart specialist providing Transesophageal Echo in Houston.