Best Cardiologists in Houston

Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center 

Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center offers cardiac services in a warm, comforting, relaxing atmosphere. The practice is committed to high quality patient care in an ever-changing health care environment.

The practice operates under the direction of Dr. Annie Varughese, Board-Certified in Cardiology and leading cardiology specialist providing treatment for heart attacks, angina, hypertension and all aspects of cardiology. The well-trained cardiology staff offers a variety of comprehensive, state-of-the-art services to diagnose, treat and manage heart disease. Our cardiac specialists improve the lives of thousands of patients every year using advanced surgical and non-surgical procedures.

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The goal is to provide state-of-the-art cardiology care in a personal setting for our patients. We provide information for you and your family so you can understand the problem, tests and any recommended treatments.

We thank you for selecting Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center for you or your loved ones. We appreciate any suggestions how we might improve our service for you.

Services Offered byAdvanced Cardiovascular Care Center

To get the services from the best cardiologists of Houston click on the above links and request an appointment.

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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease in which the heart muscle (myocardium) becomes abnormally thick (hypertrophied). The thickened heart muscle can make it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect people of any age. About one out of every 500 people has HCM. It affects men and women equally.

Other Names for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

  • Asymmetric Septal Hypertrophy
  • Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Non-obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Idiopathic Hypertrophic Sub-aortic Stenosis (IHSS)

Causes of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

HCM is a genetic condition caused by a change or mutation in one or more genes and is passed on through families. Each child of someone with HCM has a 50 per cent chance of inheriting the condition. HCM is a common cause of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in young people, including young athletes.

HCM also can affect the heart’s mitral valve, causing blood to leak backward through the valve. Sometimes, the thickened heart muscle doesn’t block blood flow out of the left ventricle. This is called non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The entire ventricle may thicken, or the thickening may happen only at the bottom of the heart. The right ventricle also may be affected.

Symptoms of HCM:

Many people with HCM don’t experience any symptoms. However, the following symptoms may occur during physical activity:

You may find that you never have any serious problems related to your condition, and with treatment, your symptoms should be controlled. However some people may find that their symptoms worsen or become harder to control in later life.

The area of heart muscle that is affected by HCM and the amount of stiffening that occurs will determine how the symptoms affect you.

For some people, a number of other conditions can develop as a result of having HCM. These may include abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias, including heart block and endocarditis.

Other symptoms that might occur, at any time, include:

  • Chest pain
  • Palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • High blood pressure
  • Light headedness and fainting

 

Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

The health care provider will perform a physical exam and listen to the heart and lungs with a stethoscope. Signs may include abnormal heart sounds or a heart murmur. These sounds may change with different body positions, High blood pressure, the pulse in your arms and neck will also be checked. The doctor may feel an abnormal heartbeat in the chest.

Close family members of people who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be screened for the condition. Tests used to diagnose heart muscle thickness, problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves (mitral valve regurgitation) may include:

  • Echocardiography, ECG
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • MRI of the heart, Chest X-ray
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)
  • 24-hour Holter monitor (heart rhythm monitor)

Risk Factors include:

Any strenuous exercise that increases after load (i.e., heavy weight lifting/training) can theoretically increase the magnitude of LV hypertrophy over time and thus worsen obstruction in subjects with pre-existing HCM. Risk factors for the development of end-stage HCM (manifesting as LV systolic dysfunction and LV dilation) include younger age of onset/presentation of HCM, a family history of HCM, increased ventricular wall thickness, along with the presence of certain genetic mutations in certain individuals.

Treatment of HCM:

At present there is no cure for HCM, but treatments are available to help control your symptoms and prevent complications. Your treatment will depend on how your heart is affected and what symptoms you have. You may need:

  • A Pacemaker – to control your heart rate
  • Medicines – to help control your blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms
  • An ICD – if you are at risk of having a life threatening abnormal heart rhythm

Seek counsel from our Houston Cardiologist if you suspect you are suffering from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) for the best treatment options for you.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com|Call: +1 281-866-7701.

Causes, Symptoms and Types of Pulmonary Stenosis – Heart Clinic in Houston

Pulmonary stenosis is narrowing of the valve between the right ventricle or lower chamber, of the heart on its way to the lungs (pulmonary artery) or both. As pulmonary stenosis becomes more severe, the thickness of the right ventricle increases and produces right ventricular hypertrophy. Pulmonary Stenosis is a congenital (present at birth) defect that occurs due to abnormal development of the fetal heart during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy.

Types of Pulmonary Stenosis:

  • Valvar Pulmonary Stenosis: The valve leaflets are thickened and/or narrowed
  • Supravalvar Pulmonary Stenosis: The portion of the pulmonary artery just above the pulmonary valve is narrowed
  • Subvalvar (Infundibular) Pulmonary Stenosis: The muscle under the valve area is thickened, narrowing the outflow tract from the right ventricle
  • Branch Peripheral Pulmonic Stenosis: The right or left pulmonary artery is narrowed, or both may be narrowed

Causes:

Physicians do not know the exact cause of pulmonary valve stenosis. The valve in the fetus may fail to develop properly during pregnancy. The disease also may have a genetic component. The condition also may accompany additional congenital heart defects. Your physician will often recommend performing additional tests to ensure your heart is healthy. Adults also can experience the condition due to a complication from an illness that affects the heart. These include rheumatic fever or carcinoid tumors in the digestive system.

Signs and Symptoms:

Pulmonary valve stenosis signs and symptoms vary, depending on the extent of the obstruction. People with mild pulmonary stenosis usually don’t have symptoms. Those with more significant stenosis often first notice symptoms while exercising. Pulmonary valve stenosis signs and symptoms may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chest pain
  • Heart murmur
  • Shortness of breath
  • Loss of consciousness (fainting)
  • Shortness of breath, especially during exertion

Testing and Diagnosis:

In rare cases, newborns have life-threatening pulmonary stenosis, which requires immediate medical attention. Diagnosis of pulmonary stenosis may require some or all of these tests:

  • Chest X-ray
  • Cardiac MRI
  • Pulse oximetry
  • Echocardiogram
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG)

Treatment:

Sometimes, treatment may not be needed if the disorder is mild. When there are also other heart defects, medicines may be used to help blood flow through the heart (prostaglandins), to help the heart beat stronger, to Prevent clots and to remove excess fluid. Prognosis without treatment is generally good and improves with appropriate intervention.

Treatment is balloon valvuloplasty, indicated for symptomatic patients and asymptomatic patients with normal systolic function and a peak gradient > 40 to 50 mm Hg. Percutaneous valve replacement may be offered at highly selected congenital heart centers, especially for younger patients or those with multiple previous procedures, in order to reduce the number of open heart procedures.

If you have pulmonary stenosis or another heart problem, prompt evaluation and treatment can help reduce risk of complications. Seek counsel from our renowned Top Cardiologists in Houston for the best treatment of Pulmonary Stenosis.

Schedule an Appointment: www.Advancedcardiodr.com |Call on: +1 281-866-7701.