Advanced Lipid Test with Advanced Cardiovascular Care Centre

Advanced Cardio Vascular care Centre:- Advanced Lipid Test

We offer cardiovascular risk assessment with Advanced Lipid Testing. We believe that cardiovascular risk reduction and prevention is one of our most important tasks. Our advanced lipid testing goes beyond standard lipid (cholesterol) tests. The advanced lipid test identifies other factors, which are inherited, that increase your risk for cardiovascular disease, heart stroke and diabetes.

This takes into consideration significantly more precise and custom-made treatment which is intended to prevent cardiovascular infection. This test likewise measures the high risk protein, lipoprotein (an), and tests for inflammation and absorption and synthesis. At the point when patient have elevated cholesterol, patient may create fatty deposits in patient veins. In the end, these stores make it troublesome for enough blood to flow through patient arteries. Understanding heart may not get as much oxygen-rich blood as it needs, which builds the risk of a heart attack. Diminished blood stream to patient cerebrum can bring about a stroke.

Elevated cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) can be acquired, yet it’s frequently the consequence of undesirable way of life decisions, and along these lines preventable and treatable. A healthy diet, general activity and here and there prescription can go far toward reducing high cholesterol.

Advanced Lipid Test identifies risk factors which are inherited, that increase risk of cardiovascular disease, heart stroked and /or diabetes. The results of advanced lipid tests help doctors to develop a treatment plan to include the best nutritional and exercise recommendations.

Advanced lipid testing is an excellent preventative health analysis provided by doctors. As an extension of standard blood-cholesterol tests, advanced lipid testing provides more detailed information of the levels of lipids in the blood that may increase the risk of high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes, or other health problems in some patients and sometimes causing heart stroke.  The advanced lipid testing procedure is a simple blood test that can be performed in the office at Advanced Cardiovascular Care Centre, but it must be prescribed by a doctor or specialist.

When Advanced Lipid Testing is Preferred?

If your cholesterol has been tested recently and you’ve been informed you have high cholesterol levels, then advanced lipid testing performed. While the necessity of advanced lipid testing remains a hot topic in some healthcare circles, for many high-risk patients this is the most effective method of assessing a prevention or treatment plan for potentially life-threatening health problems.

 Depending on your particular medical concerns, your doctor can tailor a plan to your specific needs.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com| Call: +1 281-866-7701

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Aneurysm – Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center

An aneurysm is an abnormal swelling or bulge in the wall of a blood vessel, such as an artery. It begins as a weak spot in the blood vessel wall, which balloons out of shape over time by the force of the pumping blood.

ANEURYSM can occur anywhere throughout the circulatory system, but most commonly develop along the aorta (the body’s main artery that runs the length of the trunk from the heart) and in blood vessels of the brain. Aneurysms are potentially fatal if they rupture. Death can occur within minutes. Usually, aneurysms develop at the point where a blood vessel branches, because the ‘fork’ is structurally more vulnerable.

 Symptoms of an Aneurysm

An aneurysm may have no symptoms (asymptomatic) until it is either very large or it ruptures. Symptoms depend on which blood vessel is affected.

 Types of Aneurysms

Different types of aneurysms include cerebral aneurysms, thoracic aortic aneurysms and abdominal aortic aneurysms.

Cerebral Aneurysm

A cerebral aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel in the brain. An aneurysm in the brain has no relationship to other aneurysms in the body, but in a small number of people, there is a family history. Cerebral aneurysms are more common over the age of 60.

Symptoms of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm include severe headache with rapid onset, neck pain and stiffness, increasing drowsiness, paralysis, seizures, impaired speech and visual problems. An unruptured cerebral aneurysm may have no symptoms related to it at all and may be discovered incidentally.

Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

A thoracic aortic aneurysm affects the aorta in the chest. Symptoms of a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm include pain in the chest, back and neck, coughing, breathlessness, swallowing difficulties, hoarseness of the voice, swelling of the arms, and a constricted pupil and drooping of the eyelid affecting one eye.

In many cases, a thoracic aortic aneurysm doesn’t cause any symptoms and is discovered by accident during medical examinations for an unrelated condition.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

An abdominal aortic aneurysm affects the aorta in the abdomen. Symptoms include pain in the lower back, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting, rapid heart rate (tachycardia), sweating and the sensation of a pulse in the abdomen.

Cause of Aneurysm

  • A weakness in the blood vessel wall that is present from birth (congenital aneurysm)
  • Fatty plaques (atherosclerosis) resulting in a weakness of the blood vessel wall
  • Inherited diseases that may result in weaker than normal blood vessel walls
  • Trauma, such as a crush injury to the chest
  • Polycystic kidney disease increasing the risk of cerebral aneurysm
  • Very occasionally, an infection targeting and weakening a section of blood vessel
  • The sexually transmitted infection (STI) syphilis, if untreated, targeting the aorta and weakening its walls
  • High blood pressure (hypertension) over many years resulting in damage and weakening of blood vessels

Diagnosis of an aneurysm

An aneurysm is diagnosed using a number of tests including:

  • Physical examination
  • X-rays
  • Ultrasound scans
  • Computed tomography (CT) scans or CT angiograms
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MR angiograms
  • Digital subtraction angiograms
  • Examination of cerebrospinal fluid

 Treatment for an aneurysm

Cerebral aneurysm – is repaired either by coils or stent insertion, or by surgery where the aneurysm has been clipped. If the aneurysm has ruptured, then you will need to stay in hospital for up to 21 days because of potential complications, including vasospasm and hydrocephalus. Around one third of all people who experience a ruptured cerebral aneurysm die, and less than 30 per cent get back to a pre-rupture state.

Thoracic aortic aneurysm – requires drugs to control high blood pressure and surgery to repair the aneurysm if necessary. Sometimes, the nearby heart valve may also need fixing during the operation. Most people with a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm die within minutes.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm – requires drugs to control high blood pressure and surgery to repair the aneurysm if necessary. The mortality rate is more than 50 per cent if the aneurysm ruptures.

Surgical repair of aneurysms

If the aortic aneurysm is less than five cm wide, it is usually left untreated, but closely monitored (in case it gets bigger). If it is larger than five cm, the aneurysm is surgically repaired. In most cases, the aneurysm is cut out and the hole is plugged with an artificial graft.

Depending on the location of the cerebral aneurysm, it will be treated either surgically with clipping, or by using fine platinum coils inserted in the aneurysm via an angiogram, which is a radiological procedure used, in this case, to close the aneurysm and preserve the normal flow of blood in the brain.

Treatment of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is an urgent procedure, but treatment of an unruptured aneurysm can be performed semi-electively.

Seek counsel from our Best Cardiologists in Houston if you suspect you are suffering from Aneurysms for the best treatment options for you.

 To Schedule an Appointment Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com | Call: +1 281-866-7701.

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PFO & ASD Closure – Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center

PFO & ASD Closure is a procedure to repair a small opening in the wall between the upper chambers of the heart. Two types of openings wall are Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) and Atrial Septal Defect (ASD).

Procedure of PFO & ASD closure

The techniques for PFO and ASD closure are almost equal; PFO & ASD Closure procedure is performed using X-rays and echo ultrasound guidance, usually under a general anesthetic.

Electrodes (small, sticky patches) will be placed on your chest. These are attached to a monitor to measure your heart’s electrical activity. Your heart will also be monitored with an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound), sometimes by passing a probe down your esophagus, or from your blood vessel into your heart.

 PFO AFD

A fine tube, a catheter, is passed from the blood vessel at the top of the leg to the heart, where it is guided across the PFO or ASD. A device, of which there are now many types, is carefully positioned to straddle the hole, and it is then deployed across the PFO/ASD. This will immediately diminish the potential for blood to shunt across the hole, and over time the body forms a thin lining over the device, reducing the shunt even further and generally sealing it completely.

Recovery

Patients can expect to go home either the evening of the procedure or the following day and is usually prescribed aspirin and similar drugs for a few months afterwards. You may feel sore from several hours of lying flat but this will go away in a day or so. The catheter site will be bruised, but this should go away in about a week. You might also temporarily have a sore throat if a tube was placed down your throat to take ultrasound images of your heart.

Patients can lead an entirely normal life after the procedure but should have intermittent reviews for life to check that all remains well.

Risks

There are risks with any kind of procedure, including ASD or PFO closure. But serious complications are rare. Risks include:

Temporary leg numbness or weakness in the first few hours afterward (rare) Bruising, bleeding, infection, or blood vessel damage where catheter(s) were inserted

Damage to the heart muscle that may require open heart surgery

Abnormal heart rhythm

Blood clots

Heart attack or stroke

Negative reaction to anesthetic or dye

Unforeseen complications

Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center performs PFO/ASD Closure scan services at high standards of patient personal care.

Seek counsel from our Cardiology Doctors in Houston if you suspect you observe any heart disease signs or symptoms for the best treatment options for you.

Logon to http://www.advancedcardiodr.com | Call on +1 281-866-7701.

Pulmonary Embolism

Pulmonary Embolism :

A clot that forms in one part of the body and travels in the bloodstream to another part of the body is called an embolus. A pulmonary embolism is a blockage in the pulmonary artery, the blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the lungs.

Causes of PULMONARY EMBOLISM:

Blood clots can form for a variety of reasons. Pulmonary embolisms are most often caused by Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), a condition in which blood clots form in veins deep in the body. The blood clots that most often cause pulmonary embolisms typically begin in the legs or arms.

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Embolism:

Pulmonary embolism symptoms can vary greatly, depending on how much of your lung is involved, the size of the clots and your overall health — especially the presence or absence of underlying lung disease or heart disease.

  • Cough
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath

Other Signs and Symptoms Include:

  • Fever
  • Excessive sweating
  • Clammy or discolored skin
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Leg pain or swelling, or both, usually in the calf

Risk Factors Include:

Pulmonary embolism can be life-threatening, but prompt treatment can greatly reduce the risk of death. Taking measures to prevent blood clots in your legs will help protect you against pulmonary embolism.

  • Cancer, Obesity
  • Major surgery
  • A sedentary lifestyle
  • Fractures of the leg or hip
  • A family history of embolisms
  • A history of heart attack or stroke

Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism:

Diagnosing pulmonary embolism is difficult, because there are many other medical conditions, depends on an accurate and thorough medical history and ruling out other conditions. Your doctor will need to know about your symptoms and risk factors for pulmonary embolism. This information, combined with a careful physical exam, will point to the initial tests that are best suited to diagnose a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

Tests that are often done if you have shortness of breath or chest pain include:

  • A chest X-ray, Arterial blood gas analysis, Electrocardiogram (EKG, ECG)

Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism:

Patients with pulmonary embolism are treated with clot-dissolving and clot-preventing drugs. Oxygen therapy is often needed to maintain normal oxygen concentrations. For people who can’t take anticoagulants and in some other cases, surgery may be needed to insert a device that filters blood returning to the heart and lungs. The goal of treatment is to maintain the patient’s cardiovascular and respiratory functions while the blockage resolves, which takes 10-14 days, and to prevent the formation of other emboli.

Thrombolytic therapy to dissolve blood clots is the aggressive treatment for very severe pulmonary embolism. Streptokinase, urokinase, and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) are thrombolytic agents. Heparin is the injectable anticoagulant (clotpreventing) drug of choice for preventing formation of blood clots. Warfarin, an oral anticoagulant, is usually continued when the patient leaves the hospital and doesn’t need heparin any longer.

Prevention of Pulmonary Embolism:

People having major surgery should be assessed for their DVT risk, and people at high risk of DVT may need preventative (prophylactic) doses of heparin or a similar medicine before and after surgery. Other preventative measures are also possible while in hospital. Pulmonary embolism risk can be reduced in certain patients through judicious use of anti-thrombotic drugs such as heparin, venous interruption, gradient elastic stockings and/or intermittent pneumatic compression of the legs.

Pulmonary Embolism can be life-threatening. It’s important to get immediate medical treatment for it. Seek counsel from our Houston Cardiologist if you suspect you are suffering from Pulmonary Embolism for the best treatment options for you. Call on +1 281-866-7701. Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center…!

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease in which the heart muscle (myocardium) becomes abnormally thick (hypertrophied). The thickened heart muscle can make it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect people of any age. About one out of every 500 people has HCM. It affects men and women equally.

Other Names for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

  • Asymmetric Septal Hypertrophy
  • Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic Non-obstructive Cardiomyopathy
  • Idiopathic Hypertrophic Sub-aortic Stenosis (IHSS)

Causes of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

HCM is a genetic condition caused by a change or mutation in one or more genes and is passed on through families. Each child of someone with HCM has a 50 per cent chance of inheriting the condition. HCM is a common cause of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in young people, including young athletes.

HCM also can affect the heart’s mitral valve, causing blood to leak backward through the valve. Sometimes, the thickened heart muscle doesn’t block blood flow out of the left ventricle. This is called non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The entire ventricle may thicken, or the thickening may happen only at the bottom of the heart. The right ventricle also may be affected.

Symptoms of HCM:

Many people with HCM don’t experience any symptoms. However, the following symptoms may occur during physical activity:

You may find that you never have any serious problems related to your condition, and with treatment, your symptoms should be controlled. However some people may find that their symptoms worsen or become harder to control in later life.

The area of heart muscle that is affected by HCM and the amount of stiffening that occurs will determine how the symptoms affect you.

For some people, a number of other conditions can develop as a result of having HCM. These may include abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias, including heart block and endocarditis.

Other symptoms that might occur, at any time, include:

  • Chest pain
  • Palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • High blood pressure
  • Light headedness and fainting

 

Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

The health care provider will perform a physical exam and listen to the heart and lungs with a stethoscope. Signs may include abnormal heart sounds or a heart murmur. These sounds may change with different body positions, High blood pressure, the pulse in your arms and neck will also be checked. The doctor may feel an abnormal heartbeat in the chest.

Close family members of people who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be screened for the condition. Tests used to diagnose heart muscle thickness, problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves (mitral valve regurgitation) may include:

  • Echocardiography, ECG
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • MRI of the heart, Chest X-ray
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)
  • 24-hour Holter monitor (heart rhythm monitor)

Risk Factors include:

Any strenuous exercise that increases after load (i.e., heavy weight lifting/training) can theoretically increase the magnitude of LV hypertrophy over time and thus worsen obstruction in subjects with pre-existing HCM. Risk factors for the development of end-stage HCM (manifesting as LV systolic dysfunction and LV dilation) include younger age of onset/presentation of HCM, a family history of HCM, increased ventricular wall thickness, along with the presence of certain genetic mutations in certain individuals.

Treatment of HCM:

At present there is no cure for HCM, but treatments are available to help control your symptoms and prevent complications. Your treatment will depend on how your heart is affected and what symptoms you have. You may need:

  • A Pacemaker – to control your heart rate
  • Medicines – to help control your blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms
  • An ICD – if you are at risk of having a life threatening abnormal heart rhythm

Seek counsel from our Houston Cardiologist if you suspect you are suffering from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) for the best treatment options for you.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com|Call: +1 281-866-7701.

Cardiac MRI & Coronary CTA

Cardiac MRI & Coronary CTA – Advanced Cardiovascular Care Center

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe, noninvasive test provides detailed pictures of organs and tissues. MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to create pictures of your organs and tissues. MRI doesn’t use ionizing radiation or carry any risk of causing cancer.

 Cardiac MRI Scan report provides both structure and moving pictures of the heart and major blood vessels. Doctors use cardiac MRI to get images of the beating heart and to look at its structure and function. These pictures can help them decide the best way to treat patients who have heart problems.

 Cardiac MRI is a common test. It’s used to diagnose and assess many diseases and conditions, including:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Damage caused by a heart attack
  • Heart failure
  • Heart valve problems
  • Congenital heart defects
  • Cardiac tumors

 Cardiac MRI can help explain results from other tests, such as X-rays and computed tomography scans also called CT scans. Doctors sometimes use cardiac MRI instead of invasive procedures or tests that involve radiation or dyes containing iodine.

 A contrast agent, such as gadolinium, might be injected into a vein during cardiac MRI. The substance travels to the heart and highlights the heart and blood vessels on the MRI pictures. This contrast agent often is used for people who are allergic to the dyes used in CT scanning. People who have severe kidney or liver problems may not be able to have the contrast agent. As a result, they may have a non-contrast MRI.

 Cardiac MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) allows cardiologists to see the heart in more detail than any other imaging format available. It is a non-invasive treatment that can more accurately identify in need of coronary angiography, coronary stenting or bypass operations. A cardiac MRI is a non-invasive test that uses radio waves to take images of the heart. Doctors use the test to evaluate the structure and function of the heart and blood vessels. Cardiac MRI test usually takes 45-90 minutes and it doesn’t hurt.

Coronary CTA is used as a noninvasive method for detecting blockages in the coronary arteries. A CTA can be performed much faster (in less than one minute) than a cardiac catheterization, with potentially less risk and discomfort as well as decreased recovery time.

 A coronary computed tomography angiogram (CCTA) uses advanced CT technology, along with intravenous (IV) contrast material (dye), to obtain high-resolution, 3D pictures of the moving heart and great vessels.

 Coronary CTA is also called multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT), cardiac CT or cardiac CAT. During CTA, X-rays pass through the body and are picked up by detectors in the scanner that produce 3D images on a computer screen. These images enable physicians to determine whether plaque or calcium deposits are present in the artery walls.

 Coronary CTA (CCTA) allows direct visualization of the coronary artery wall and lumen with the administration of intravenous contrast. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiogram (CTA) technology results in structure of the functioning of heart.  Coronary CTA test can provide important insights to their primary physician into the extent and nature of plaque formation with or without any narrowing of the coronary arteries.

 Who should have a Coronary CTA Test?

Intermediate to high-risk profiles for coronary artery disease, but who do not have typical symptoms especially chest pain, shortness of breath, or fatigue during heavy physical activity.

  • Unusual symptoms for coronary artery disease, but low to intermediate risk profiles for coronary artery disease
  • Unclear or conclusive stress-test (treadmill test) results

 Get tested by Cardiac MRI/Coronary CTA scans to identify the imaging of the complete cardiovascular system.

Visit us at: www.advancedcardiodr.com | Call: +1 281-866-7701

Coronary Angiogram Services in Houston

Coronary Angiogram :-

A coronary angiogram is a system in which X-beam imaging looks inside your heart’s blood vessels. Coronary angiograms are one of a few methods known as Cardiac Catheterization. Catheterization characterizes any strategy where a long, thin, Flexible Plastic Tube (catheter) is embedded into one’s body. Heart Catheter techniques can help with diagnosing and treating heart and blood vessel conditions. A coronary angiogram which may analyze heart conditions—is the most widely recognized sort of heart catheter methodology.

Coronary Angiogram

Coronary angiograms are prescribed by a specialist if an individual if encountering any of the accompanying side effects:

  • Heart disappointment
  • New or expanding mid-section pain
  • A heart valve issue that requires surgery
  • Other blood vessel issues or a mid-section damage
  • Symptoms of coronary vein disease, for example, mid-section pain
  • Pain in the mid-section, jaw, neck or arm that can’t be clarified by different tests
  • Congenital Heart Disease or a heart abandon that has been with the person since conception

A specialist might likewise prescribe an angiogram if the individual is having surgery disconnected to the heart, yet may be at high danger of showing at least a bit of kindness issue amid the surgery. There are dangers connected with angiograms. In this manner, it is normally done after non-invasive heart tests have been performed, for example, an electrocardiogram, an echocardiogram or a stress test.

An angiogram can show specialists what’s the issue with in the blood vessels. It can:

  • Show what number of coronary arteries is obstructed by Fatty Plaques
  • Pinpoint where blockages are situated in blood vessels
  • Show the amount of blood stream is obstructed through blood vessels
  • Check the consequences of a past coronary bypass surgery
  • Check the blood move through the heart and blood vessels

In view of the outcomes, one’s specialist can figure out what treatment is best for the patient and how much peril the heart condition postures to one’s wellbeing. After effects of the angiogram ought to be accessible that day the procedure is performed.

If you feel you would benefit from a coronary angiogram, talk to Cardiology Doctor in Houston to determine the best course of action.

Logon to www.advancedcardiodr.com for the best cardiologists in Houston.